Cacti, succulents, and other houseplants basking in spring sunshine – Wordless Wednesday

Chelone lyonii, Pink turtle head – A lovely native species offering autumn blooms

The beautiful Chelone lyonii ‘Hot Lips’ also goes by the common name of pink turtlehead. It blooms from July straight through to October, so it’s a terrific addition to any garden.

Chelone comes from the Greek word meaning tortoise because each blossom obviously resembles, without too much imagination, a turtle’s head.

A great perennial for late summer colour that doesn’t much like excessive heat, it will tolerate full sun if its feet are kept cool. The flowers are primarily pollinated by bees, but the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds will often visit them as well. The foliage of this plant is known to be bitter so it’s avoided by Deer and other herbivores. In my own experience the deer have yet to touch the Chelone, so this species is something to cheer about by any rural gardener!

Lucky to have this plant in my garden due to a lovely share from another local gardener, in the six or so years since it’s established, the plant has multiplied from one single flowering stem into more than a dozen. With its strong stems, the clump doesn’t flop over after a rainstorm.

It’s worth noting that there’s a white flowering species called Chelone glabra that I’d like to get my hands on! A host plant for the endangered Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly, and like their pink cousin they too will thrive in damp locations and shady glades.

It’s my hope to collect many seeds this year. I’ll be able to offer them online at my Etsy shop. The pollinators did their jobs well, seed heads are forming, and with a little luck the mild weather we’re currently experiencing means they’ll ripen before the first hard frost. Then I can get my hands on some! Culture/Info:

  • Foliage: Herbaceous smooth-textured.
  • Requires consistently moist soil.
  • Propagation Methods: By dividing the root-ball or from seed.
  • Direct sow outdoors in fall or early spring.
  • Stratify seeds if sowing indoors.
  • Seed Collecting: Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds.
  • Non-patented native perennial
  • Height: 24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Thanks for visiting. Happy Autumn! : )

Flowering Friday – Gladiola

Having worked as a floral designer in Toronto for many years, I developed a love for gladiolas, despite the opinion of many who may look upon them only as flowers for funerals.

These photos were taken at our local farmers’ market a few years ago, back when I was the market manager. Fisher Farms, one of our attendees had several buckets of these beauties in their booth. That glorious group seemed beg me to snap some photos.

My preference is for purple or the light green glads. A vase of a dozen or so look spectacular on our kitchen counter, and as a cut flower they last for ages! Lots of bang for your buck.

Admittedly there were many gladiolas in the garden when we bought our current house. All those spikes standing up like soldiers didn’t endear themselves to me. Not a very welcoming look, so out they went! Just plain bad Feng Shui.. (Plus, they’re not hardy here, and I can be a lazy gardener in my own plot. Who has time to plant the corms each spring and remove them again in the fall? Not me!)  In any case, I’m happy to support local growers and purchase any flowers I prefer in a vase as opposed to my garden, from them.

Lots of colour to share on a monochromatic early spring day! Remember, they’re not just for funerals! Happy flowering Friday, everyone.