When the amaryllis, Hippeastrum striatum, flowers are blooming it’s time to be a bee. #FridayFlower

Being a bee today! Happily, it’s amaryllis season again, so I’ve been pollinating the flowers of this bulb by hand.

I look forward to this favourite horticultural activity every year! 🙂

Also looking forward to harvesting the seeds they’ll produce in a few weeks time, and then sowing those offspring in order to grow more amaryllis babies.

The cycle continues!

More on this amaryllis: Its botanical name is Hippeastrum striatum.  It’s believed to be one of the first hybrid amaryllis, with a modern botanical history dating back to the late 1700’s.

Sometimes called a ‘Barbados lily’, this flowering herbaceous perennial bulb plant hails from the Amaryllidaceae family, and it’s native to the southern and eastern regions of Brazil.

It was originally brought to the UK upon its discovery back in 1759, and first listed in the Library at Kew in 1789.

Discovering more history on this amaryllis is very exciting!

I only wish I could share this information with my late great Uncle Allan from whom I inherited the plant. He always wanted to know more about the amaryllis because it originated from his grandmother, who incidentally was my Great-great Grandmother.

But, that’s not going to happen now, so I’m just grateful to be its current caretaker, and happy to continue, (in some small way), to propagate and promote the heritage and lineage of this lovely plant.

For tips on how to propagate your amaryllis, or if you’re seeking some information on how to keep an Amaryllis healthy and happy from year to year, I’ve written a more in-depth blog post here.

Happy Flowering Friday, everyone!

#FridayFlowers in winter? Not so much! Still, there is beauty to be found in the garden

This time of year, there’s nothing blooming in the garden, however there is still much beauty to be found. 

The hydrangeas have long since faded and dried, but I like to leave them over the winter because of the lovely snow-laden look about them.

Lucky to have several garden obelisks around the property, (with a big thanks to my handy hubby), they support all kinds of things I like to grow from spring to fall, including peas, runner beans, clematis, and morning glory.

These sturdy stands offer much winter interest this time of year! Sculptures that hold the snow, and my attention.

There are lots of berries still on trees. Food for the birds, but also a bright red colour that’s in such contrast to what can otherwise be a very monochromatic season.

And, not unlike this geranium by the kitchen window, (which blooms several times over the winter for me, inside of course!), I’ll (try to) patiently wait for the next time I can be outside  again, basking in the warm sunshine flooding the garden.

With the equinox and winter solstice this coming weekend, the days will once again grow longer. It’ll be good to be back on the right track! Happy Solstice to all. ~ Karen

 

The Musk Mallow, or Malva moschata for Flowering Friday

Widely grown as an ornamental plant for its attractive and slightly scented flowers, the musk mallow blooms throughout the summer.

Several cultivars have been selected for variation in flower colour, including the one shown here from my garden, ‘Rosea’, with its dark pink flowers.  The cultivar ‘Alba’ (white flowered) earned the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.

Though not native to North America, (more Eastern European/Central Asia), I consider it an heirloom plant because it’s been in cultivation for a long time, as you can see from the hand-coloured botanical engraving below from the 1700’s.

Pretty colour, lovely scent, drought tolerant, and the bees love them… The musk mallow ticks all the right boxes when I’m choosing flowers for my garden! 🙂