Upcoming art and gardening related workshops

Wall Flower Studio is offering two distinctly different upcoming workshops!

  1. Kokedama moss ball workshop

Based on ancient Japanese art, the literal translation of Kokedama is ‘moss ball’.
Kokedama is essentially any plant wrapped in moss and doesn’t require a container. The moss is the container!
Once created, Kokedama can sit anywhere or be hung from string.
Perfect for small spaces, as a table decoration, on the a windowsill, or hanging above one, this living art will enliven any living/office space.
Join Karen on Sunday October 22 to make and take home your very own Kokedama!
All supplies provided! Fee: $30.00


2.  Papier-mâché Animal Workshop

Interested in learning the art of Papier-mâché?
Join Karen for a fun-filled adventure & learn how to create your own 3D animal sculpture! (*There are 2 spots left)

It’s fun, messy, and it’s a 3 date class… One to build, one to cover with papier-mâché, and one to paint.

Dates: Sunday Oct. 29th + Sunday Nov. 5th + Sunday Nov. 12th. (2-4 p.m.)
Fee: $90.00 .. break it down to only 30 bucks per week. A great price for a fun class.
Come create, and don’t forget to bring along your inner child!


Please r.s.v.p. for either (or both) workshop(s) to: 705.286.6999sloanartgallery(at)gmail(dot)com (or) at Wall Flower Studio on Facebook.

Wall Flower Studio is located at 102 Bobcaygeon Rd. – Minden Ontario. (Directly across from the CIBC) – Please see map here on our website. Thank you!

Succulent container garden workshop at Wall Flower Studio

Succulent  Container Workshop – Saturday May 13th, 2017

Succulents come in an amazing array of colours and textures. Combining them in an unusual container for indoors or out is fun and easy to do.

In this workshop, participants will receive instructions, guidance and all the supplies to create a succulent garden in an unusual container to take home and nurture!
Make one as a gift for your mom, or keep it for yourself. 🙂

Class size is limited to 6 participants due to space requirements at the store.

– Date: Sat. May 13th at 3:30 – 4:30 pm
– Place: Wall Flower Studio – Minden Ontario
– Fee: 25$
– Please rsvp by May 9th. Thank you!

For more information, contact Wall Flower Studio at:  sloanartgallery (at) gmail (dot) com  -or-  705-286-6999 

 

*** Update: This workshop is now full. However, I’d be happy to hold another similar class on May 14th, (Mother’s Day) – Please get in touch if you’re interested – we’ll set something up! Thank you, Karen.

DIY Infused Calendula Oil – An at home apothecary skin care treatment to create for yourself!

Making your own Calendula infused oil is very easy to do!

calendula-oil-in-progress-wfsWinter especially saps the moisture out of our skin. Creating an oil from the petals of Calendula officinalis, otherwise known as pot marigold, is the perfect strategy when you want to combat the drying effects of this harsh season.  By following the steps below,  you can have your very own batch of skin care in no time at all!

Here is what you’ll need:

  • Dried, organic calendula flower petals
  • A carrier oil (I prefer Safflower oil, but Olive oil or Sunflower oil work well, too.)
  • A glass jar with lid. Make sure to clean it first!

infused-rose-calendula-oil-at-wall-flower-studioHere is how to do it:

  • Fill the jar about 2/3 full with the dried petals.
  • Next, slowly poured the oil over the petals, making sure they’re all submerged
  • Wait 4-6 weeks so all the goodness of the calendula is infused into the oil.
  • Store the jar in a warm dry spot for the infusion to occur. Before you know it, you’ll have your very own homemade infused Calendula oil, too.
  • Once the 4 weeks are up, strain the flowers out and there you have it… Your very own homemade Calendula oil.
  • Use the soaked flower petals as a foot scrub before discarding. Mix a handful of the petals with a cup of sea salt and scrub away.

calendula-wfs-fbCalendula oil is great to use after a bath or shower. It seeps in without feeling overly oily, making skin feel very soft and supple.

Apply it topically where needed.

I use it as a key ingredient in my lip balms, salves and other bath products.

*For more information on Calendula visit the: University of Maryland Medical Center

Feel free to get creative. Have fun and enjoy!

Sharing our DIY Moth repel bag recipe, plus other handy household uses for herbs

lavender-sachets-moth-repel-dryer-bagsWe’re sharing a few fragrant, old time herbal potpourri recipes you can create for everyday household use. These are  remedies that have stood the test of time. No chemicals required!

To make a Moth Repel Bag, use a muslin or organic cotton drawstring bag which allows the scent of the herbs inside to circulate without restriction.  The herbs I’ve suggested (below) are pleasant for people, but not moths! The sachets help to keep wool, angora, cashmere, and other natural animal hair fibres safe.

In all actuality, herbs do not repel moths, but rather mask the scent of most natural fibres, keeping them safely disguised from unwanted visitors.


Mint Moth Chase-Away
2 cups of dried mint, either spearmint or peppermint
1/3 cup of dried rosemary
1 cup dried Thyme
1/3 cup of ground cloves


Cedar Shaving Chaser
2 cups of cedar shavings
1/2 cup of Lavender
1/2 cup of wormwood
1/2 cup of ground cloves


Lavender  (Old French recipe)
2 cups of Lavender
1/2 cup of pennyroyal
1/2 cup of ground cloves
1 cup of dried thyme


last-of-the-lavender-harvestLavender is my ‘go-to’ herb. I’ve been known to pop a couple sachets inside the hockey skates and work boots that accumulate around our house. 😉

Sachets can also be thrown in the dryer, which will lightly scent your sheets & towels. Just give them a good squeeze after each use to release the oils from the flowers, which is what offers that lovely aromatherapy scent. The bags can be used this way, about a dozen times before the florets start to get a bit icky. Then you know it’s time to compost them, bag and all! : )

Other herbs said to ward off moths include Tansy, Sage, Santolina, and Southernwood.
* Pet owners take note: Pennyroyal is also said to repel fleas.

Have a lovely weekend! ~ Karen

Wall Flower Studio business logo square

How to grow, pollinate and harvest seeds from an amaryllis – It’s very easy!

amaryllis-vittata-february-2015pistil-and-stigma-for-pollinating-the-amaryllis-karen-sloanPollinating and saving seeds from Amaryllis is very simple. All you need is a light touch.

Step 1: Collect some pollen, (gently), on your finger from the stamen. (see next photo)
Step 2: Dust it lightly on the stigma.
This should be done when the stigma (Pistil) is completely open.

Just a note: Some people use a paint brush to transfer the pollen, but this is not a requirement if you’re very gentle.

I don’t pollinate any flower with its own pollen. I’ll use the pollen from one flower to pollinate another .

seed-pod-developing-on-the-amaryllis-karen-sloan-wall-flower-studio

Unripe seed pod

This is a seed pod that develops not long after, from the pollinated flower that dies back.

Let it mature and turn brown. Then the seed head is ready to harvest.

amaryllis-seed-pod-opening-copyright-karen-sloan-wall-flower-studio

Seed pod is ready to harvest.

 

 

 

 

Many people ask me how to bring an Amaryllis  into bloom again…  Here’s my advice:

Don’t dig up your bulbs and stick them in the closet in the fall.  Don’t do it. It doesn’t happen that way in nature!

Why anyone started promoting such fiction, I’ll never know.

Seriously, I can’t tell you how much this myth irritates me, and every year I see gardening articles perpetuating this falsehood, repeating it verbatim like parrots, likely by writers who haven’t actually accomplished what they’re proposing you to do..

Because of that, it’s no wonder so many people tell me they’ve given up growing these beauties and can’t get a bulb to re-flower the next year. Purely because something so simple has been made to seem so very complicated…. There’s my rant for today!

amaryllis-seeds-karen-sloan-wall-flower-studio

Freshly harvested, plump amaryllis seeds

In any case, bulbs have an internal clock that works very well, with or without our help.

As long as the flower stalks are allowed to die back naturally after flowering, and there has been sufficient water, light and food over the course of the year, (I only give them a bit of very diluted coffee or tea once a month), then you have the secret to getting them to flower again.

amaryllis-wfsMy amaryllis is 130 years old.

It was my originally my great-great grandmother’s plant, a true heirloom, and I cherish it!

It blooms every year, and sometimes twice. I can tell you, it has NEVER seen the inside of a closet!

Treat it as you would any houseplant, all year long, but ease up on the watering in November.

Don’t let your plant completely dry out, but water it once per month until a flower bud starts to emerge. Then water every 10 days or so. After the flowers finish, let the stalks die back naturally. This is very important as this is what provides the bulb with the energy to produce a flower next year… 

If you don’t like the look of the plant while it’s in this semi-dormant state, put it in a room where it’s not so visible.

Leaves will die back too, and watering should be lessened again ‘til  mid March when the sun gets higher in the sky, and you’ll see an abundance of new foliage. Water more often, as the cycle has begun again.