Baking Cream Scones. Sharing a #recipe that takes me back in time

Cream Scones with recipe

Over the last few years, I’ve surprised myself with just how much more interested I am in the act of creating food. Sure, I grow herbs and veggies in my garden, and can cook chicken, beef dishes, heat up vegetables, and bake muffins or a cake out of a box, but something was lacking.

Maybe it’s just me, or maybe it’s because fast food is so accessible, and the fact that we live an ‘I want it now’ culture. In any case, I’ve found my food experiences inadequate of late.

What I’ve always cooked is edible and tastes fine, but upon reflection, shouldn’t the food we eat fully engage our senses? Shouldn’t there be less indifference and more attention given to what we put on the plate? Maybe we need to locate that enthusiasm again and fully participate in the act of creating food. These are the things I’ve been considering lately, along with this latent desire to mindfully enjoy each and every bite! And, does it take reaching middle age to find all of this out?!

Sometimes I think about my mom and how she valiantly tried to teach me how to cook. When I was younger, I just wanted to be outside, in the garden or in the pool, and as an admitted introvert, I preferred hanging out in my room listening to music or reading books. I was happy to eat what mom made, but not so big on the creating part! It seemed like a chore.

Fast forward to my thirties when my Mom died. Not only did I grieve for her, but as it turned out, for her cooking. That sounds outrageously selfish, and I do miss her, but I also miss her perfect Yorkshire pudding, scrumptious scalloped potatoes, oozing butter tarts full of plump raisins. I could go on. Really, I took her cooking and what she served us for granted. Maybe I thought I could learn by osmosis, and maybe that’s not far off because I have learned along the way how some of the things she taught or told me actually stuck.

So, not only do I miss my her presence, but I miss the smell of the kitchen when the aroma of the food wafted through the house. My dad and I were talking about her one day, and I brought this up. He felt the same way of course, and happily he’d kept all of her handwritten recipes and cookbooks.

He gave them to me, (probably thinking it was a futile effort, lol), several years ago, but in the interim, I discovered three more reasons to up the ante on my kitchen skills.

One is Pinterest.  I don’t know about you, but I’ve noted how often I’m on that website when it’s getting close to dinner time and I’m hungry! All of those scrumptious recipes to save on my recipe pin board… It’s such a great place to find many a tantalizing food image, along with a link to the recipe. When I saw the breadth of choice out there, it was an epiphany. I’ve been persuaded to try cooking something new.

The second thing would be cooking shows, (and food blogs, too), but especially cooking shows, each hosted by many different personalities, because that host sets the flavour of the show, (pardon the pun), just like the food recipes they’re creating.

There’s a show about food for everyone. No wonder there’s a Food Network! Having said that, it was likely Anthony Bourdain’s show who first engaged my attention on CNN. I loved how he traveled the world, diving into different cultures and sharing their love of food. I still enjoy seeing the old Julia Child shows on PBS too, or Lidia’s Kitchen on the Telelatino channel. In their own way, each chef is so entertaining. Plus, you learn something new, and you get to eat!

The third is probably the most important reason. Along with my mom’s cook books, I now have in my possession the ones that belonged to my great-great grandmother. These books hail from the mid 1800’s into the early part of the 20th century.

This all hearkens back to my mom. Cooking or baking from a recipe passed down from our ancestors and people we love, but who are now lost to us, is a special way to visit them once in a while.

Back to the present. Today I baked my mom’s cream scones from her recipe. Talk about comfort food on a cold winter day!

Not only did they turn out really well, but boy, did I ever enjoy eating them again after so many years!

While they baked, I closed my eyes. The smell from my own oven took me right back to mom’s kitchen. It was truly wonderful, and the best part is that these scones are delicious, and so easy to make!

I’d like to share that recipe here.

Noreen’s Cream Scones

  • 2 cups all purpose flour (I used unbleached)
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 cup table cream (18%)

Mix dry ingredients, add butter, stir in cream, and knead

Roll into a pie shape, (on floured surface)

Bake on non-stick pan

10-12 minutes at 450 degrees

Enjoy! ~ Karen

If I knew you were coming I’d have baked a cake! – Here’s a recipe instead!

The title of this post refers to a tune my Mother-in-law used to sing to my son.

In this case, I was actually going somewhere. I baked this cake to take and share at our family Christmas dinner.

-> But, I forgot to take it!

After kicking myself over this memory lapse, we ate it when we got home. (Which wasn’t such a bad thing, either.)

I took a couple photos before we ate it, but do wish I’d taken photos during the baking process. Next time for sure…

In any case, I’d like to share the recipe. It’s somewhat based on a recipe of my Mother’s that I found in an old cookbook of hers from 1959, called ‘Nellie Lyle Pattinson’s Canadian Cook Book’, by the Ryerson Press.

The recipe is called ‘Orange Cake’, but I put my own twist on the recipe and turned it into a ‘Lemon Cardamom Cake’.

With no oranges at home, I subbed it with lemons instead, and added cardamom too, which blends perfectly with citrus.

Without further ado, here you go!

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup shortening
  • 1 & 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • grated rind of 1 lemon
  • 3 cups pastry flour
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice (freshly squeezed if you can!)
  • 3/4 cup of milk
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp finely ground cardamom pods
  1. Preheat oven to 350, grease a 9″ round pan. (You’ll likely have more batter than you need, so make some cupcakes, too. I used an pie pan to create a more decorative edge, purchased on Etsy.)
  2.  Cream shortening thoroughly until light and fluffy – add vanilla extract & grated lemon
  3. Add sugar gradually, mixing well after each addition
  4. Add eggs, one at a time, mix in milk. Beat until mixture is smooth
  5. Sift flour, measure, mix.
  6. Sift baking powder, salt, and cardamom
  7. Add all dry ingredients, & mix until smooth
  8. Pour batter into prepared pans
  9. Bake at 350 for about 30 minutes (up to 45 for square pan) Stick a toothpick in. If it’s clean, the cake is ready
  10. Let cool on rack

In addition to that, I slathered on some store bought whip cream, then added some blueberries and raspberries. It gave it a nice colour! Then some confectioner’s sugar sifted on top. Yum!

If you decide to make it, I’d love to hear how it turns out. Happy baking! ~ Karen

The Musk Mallow, or Malva moschata for Flowering Friday

Widely grown as an ornamental plant for its attractive and slightly scented flowers, the musk mallow blooms throughout the summer.

Several cultivars have been selected for variation in flower colour, including the one shown here from my garden, ‘Rosea’, with its dark pink flowers.  The cultivar ‘Alba’ (white flowered) earned the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.

Though not native to North America, (more Eastern European/Central Asia), I consider it an heirloom plant because it’s been in cultivation for a long time, as you can see from the hand-coloured botanical engraving below from the 1700’s.

Pretty colour, lovely scent, drought tolerant, and the bees love them… The musk mallow ticks all the right boxes when I’m choosing flowers for my garden! 🙂

 

Encounters with Deer

Deer have played a significant role in folklore and mythology, in partnership with cultures around the world, and throughout most of our known human existence.

Many European cultures equated deer with woodland deities, including Greece. Artemis, the Greek goddess of wilderness played the role of virgin huntress. One time, a man named Actaeon witnessed Artemis bathing nude in a pool. She transformed him into a stag and his own hounds tore him to pieces. Talk about revenge!

The Iron Age Celts also have stories of people and deities who took the form of deer. Finn mac Cumhail, leader of Ireland’s heroic band, the legendary Fianna, was out hunting, and his hounds cornered a beautiful white deer, but they refused his order to attack. That night, Finn was visited by the goddess Sadhbh who explained how she was that deer, under a magic spell from which the only chance of her release would come about by his declaration of love for her. A beautiful story, but a tragic tale.

Moving on to the 6th century, Saint Gregory of Tours wrote chronicles of the Merovingian rulers. His Historia Francorum contained a legend concerning King Clovis I, who prayed to Christ in one of his campaigns so they could find a place to cross the river Vienne. Considered as sign from the divine, a huge deer appeared to the king’s army and showed them where they could cross the river, and that’s (supposedly) what they did.

Deer appear in art from Paleolithic cave paintings , and they have played a role in mythology, religion, and literature throughout history, as well as in heraldry.

Their economic importance includes the use of their meat as venison, their skins as soft, strong buckskin, and their antlers as tools, including handles for knives. Deer hunting has been a popular activity since at least the middle Ages.

According to the many different interpretations of deer as animal messengers, including totem animals from the Native American traditions, a deer represents gentleness and suggests the use of kindness in each of our endeavours.

In addition to that, if a deer crosses your path, you are likely a compassionate person who gives and receives unconditional love.

In any case, it’s always wonderful to witness a visit from the deer, and to know what depth of their nature is revealed to us and included within each encounter.

Joe Pye Weed – a favourite native plant for bees, butterflies, and me!

Joe Pye Weed, aka Eupatorium maculatum, (or in some circles, Eutrochium), is a big favourite with bees, butterflies, and me!

Every year it seems, nature offers me a new favourite flower, perhaps one I’ve previously known about but overlooked. These beautiful natives, despite having the word ‘weed’ in their name, should not be overlooked by gardeners.

The bright pink to mauve flowers offer food to pollinators from July through late September.  A native plant, this lovely, tall specimen thrives in full sun to light shade.

It prefers moist soil, but will tolerate a drier spot if it’s watered well enough in the beginning, so their roots can grow deep enough and therefore not dry out too quickly.

Give them optimum conditions, they’ll grow up to 6 feet tall in Zones 4 through 8.

Their preferred habitat includes moist meadows, or the banks along a stream or pond. Plant them in your butterfly/pollinator garden, or a slightly damp spot on your property.

(If you’re smitten with these flowers like I am, just an FYI that I’ll have some seeds from this lovely plant listed in my Etsy shop over the next day or so.)

Thank you!