November garden musings… switching gears from the outdoors to inside.

There’s a chill in the air, fresh snow on the ground, and I’m craving a seat next to the fireplace, along with a big mug of hot chocolate. Yum!

Technically it’s still autumn, but winter doesn’t care. Happy to disregard the calendar, it has staked a claim on my garden already, and as you can see, the lavender plants are snug as bugs in rugs, tucked happily in the snow.

Left with no choice but to let it go gently into that good night, (with apologies to Dylan Thomas), I’ll switch gears now and focus on the indoor plants.

My tropicals, & succulents especially, must absolutely shudder at the thought the over-attention they’ll now receive all winter long, which is a drastic change from the absolute neglect I offer them spring through fall.

I’m pretty good about not over-watering, so this attention, (a smidge of OCD), mainly includes following the sunshine by moving most of the plants closer to any window that has southern exposure for the day, trimming leaves, repotting, and the like.

I cram many of them on our dining room table and kitchen counter so they can catch some rays on brighter days, which my family thankfully ignores because they’re used to it by now.

Except for our cat, who sometimes seems quite annoyed at the lack of space she has to stretch out. As cats will do, she pays it forward by chewing, and flicking some of the foliage with her long sharp claws that may invade her territory.

And, look out in February when seed starting season is upon us. Available space at those southern windows shrinks drastically when trays containing my future vegetable garden start sprouting in small, hand-made newspaper pots.

However, it’s still November. Time to end this post, practice some serious Hygge, make that hot chocolate, (with mini-marshmallows), grab a good book, get cozy by the fire, and settle in for the season.

Have a good week! Thanks for stopping by. 🙂

Sharing our DIY Moth repel bag recipe, plus other handy household uses for herbs

lavender-sachets-moth-repel-dryer-bagsWe’re sharing a few fragrant, old time herbal potpourri recipes you can create for everyday household use. These are  remedies that have stood the test of time. No chemicals required!

To make a Moth Repel Bag, use a muslin or organic cotton drawstring bag which allows the scent of the herbs inside to circulate without restriction.  The herbs I’ve suggested (below) are pleasant for people, but not moths! The sachets help to keep wool, angora, cashmere, and other natural animal hair fibres safe.

In all actuality, herbs do not repel moths, but rather mask the scent of most natural fibres, keeping them safely disguised from unwanted visitors.


Mint Moth Chase-Away
2 cups of dried mint, either spearmint or peppermint
1/3 cup of dried rosemary
1 cup dried Thyme
1/3 cup of ground cloves


Cedar Shaving Chaser
2 cups of cedar shavings
1/2 cup of Lavender
1/2 cup of wormwood
1/2 cup of ground cloves


Lavender  (Old French recipe)
2 cups of Lavender
1/2 cup of pennyroyal
1/2 cup of ground cloves
1 cup of dried thyme


last-of-the-lavender-harvestLavender is my ‘go-to’ herb. I’ve been known to pop a couple sachets inside the hockey skates and work boots that accumulate around our house. 😉

Sachets can also be thrown in the dryer, which will lightly scent your sheets & towels. Just give them a good squeeze after each use to release the oils from the flowers, which is what offers that lovely aromatherapy scent. The bags can be used this way, about a dozen times before the florets start to get a bit icky. Then you know it’s time to compost them, bag and all! : )

Other herbs said to ward off moths include Tansy, Sage, Santolina, and Southernwood.
* Pet owners take note: Pennyroyal is also said to repel fleas.

Have a lovely weekend! ~ Karen

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Sharing our Basil Pesto recipe – Bon AppĂ©tit!

Mmmm, Pesto.

fresh-basil-pesto-recipe-wfsDrizzle it over pasta, mix it in salads, or top it on cooked veggies such as green beans, asparagus, or artichoke.

Please feel free to print (and/or) share our recipes!

Just a note about the ingredients in this pesto.. I like to mix it up a bit sometimes by adding spinach, pine nuts, and  just hint of our own locally made herbal vinegar. Yum!

Bon Appétit!