Succulent container garden workshop at Wall Flower Studio

Succulent  Container Workshop – Saturday May 13th, 2017

Succulents come in an amazing array of colours and textures. Combining them in an unusual container for indoors or out is fun and easy to do.

In this workshop, participants will receive instructions, guidance and all the supplies to create a succulent garden in an unusual container to take home and nurture!
Make one as a gift for your mom, or keep it for yourself. 🙂

Class size is limited to 6 participants due to space requirements at the store.

– Date: Sat. May 13th at 3:30 – 4:30 pm
– Place: Wall Flower Studio – Minden Ontario
– Fee: 25$
– Please rsvp by May 9th. Thank you!

For more information, contact Wall Flower Studio at:  sloanartgallery (at) gmail (dot) com  -or-  705-286-6999 

 

*** Update: This workshop is now full. However, I’d be happy to hold another similar class on May 14th, (Mother’s Day) – Please get in touch if you’re interested – we’ll set something up! Thank you, Karen.

Gardening experiments on the windowsill

With the proper amount of sunlight, basil (pictured here), and other culinary herbs can be grown year round on a windowsill.

The ability to pinch fresh foliage from herbs grown in my kitchen for flavouring recipes during winter months has become less of an experiment and more of a necessity in our house!

Beyond that, there are many simple gardening experiments people of all ages might enjoy. Many of us may recall planting bean seeds in cup with wet paper towel during grade school in an effort to see how they’d grow.

When the mood strikes, I plant seeds from fruits and veggies purchased from the grocery store, especially during winter, just to see if anything will happen!

That’s where the potato in the photo comes in. I simply cut it in half and placed it on the dish in a bit of water. Since it’s actually sprouting, I’ll go a step further this spring and plant it outside in a container to see if it will produce an actual crop!

The other picture here is a container by our kitchen sink where I’m growing Amaryllis seedlings.

A few weeks ago I was enjoying some of the sweetest of Clementine oranges from Spain. Those delicious fruit had many seeds in them so I (somewhat mindlessly), stuck a few seeds into the soil. In all honesty, I completely forgot about them until I went to water my plants the other day. I saw the sprouts emerging  and was absolutely tickled. Next thing you know I began to envision a lush tree full of those lovely fruit growing in my dining room, and me plucking them at will off the branches. Talk about an active imagination!

However, with a positive outlook and an open mind, I’ll likely continue experimenting with these kinds of benign windowsill gardening trials, and encourage my fellow gardeners to give them a try, too!

Find the Lucky Four-leaf Clover

May you live as long as you want, And never want as long as you live.

~ Irish blessing

Wikipedia offers a host of ‘lucky symbols’ from various cultures here, if you’re so inclined!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

 

DIY Infused Calendula Oil – An at home apothecary skin care treatment to create for yourself!

Making your own Calendula infused oil is very easy to do!

calendula-oil-in-progress-wfsWinter especially saps the moisture out of our skin. Creating an oil from the petals of Calendula officinalis, otherwise known as pot marigold, is the perfect strategy when you want to combat the drying effects of this harsh season.  By following the steps below,  you can have your very own batch of skin care in no time at all!

Here is what you’ll need:

  • Dried, organic calendula flower petals
  • A carrier oil (I prefer Safflower oil, but Olive oil or Sunflower oil work well, too.)
  • A glass jar with lid. Make sure to clean it first!

infused-rose-calendula-oil-at-wall-flower-studioHere is how to do it:

  • Fill the jar about 2/3 full with the dried petals.
  • Next, slowly poured the oil over the petals, making sure they’re all submerged
  • Wait 4-6 weeks so all the goodness of the calendula is infused into the oil.
  • Store the jar in a warm dry spot for the infusion to occur. Before you know it, you’ll have your very own homemade infused Calendula oil, too.
  • Once the 4 weeks are up, strain the flowers out and there you have it… Your very own homemade Calendula oil.
  • Use the soaked flower petals as a foot scrub before discarding. Mix a handful of the petals with a cup of sea salt and scrub away.

calendula-wfs-fbCalendula oil is great to use after a bath or shower. It seeps in without feeling overly oily, making skin feel very soft and supple.

Apply it topically where needed.

I use it as a key ingredient in my lip balms, salves and other bath products.

*For more information on Calendula visit the: University of Maryland Medical Center

Feel free to get creative. Have fun and enjoy!